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of a strong-handed role in sort of picking winners and losers in determining who gets educated and how they get educated -- those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate. and i think we have to recognize that if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with inequality or the inability to create jobs or the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else, we're going to lose our influence, the model's going to change, and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what's china doing right? >> guest: well, they're growing fast. that helps. by 2030, you know, china's second biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy, but really their growth has been internal. by 2030, which is not that long away although it sounds far away, they'll be the world's largest consumer economy. they'll be the ones setting the trend in terms of what a car is like and what a washing machine is like can and what an ipad is like. but they're also building more cities than anybody else. they're g
is a massive public education campaign for parents and educators. for people about how to use these tools responsibly. >> we are still adapting as a society and learning what it means to be exposed due to the way we track our lives and share information online. and i do agree with that. that's part of the problem here, getting everyone educated. >> right now employers are saying, all right, if you want a job come you have to tell us your password so we can go on your private website. >> the bottom line is there are laws governing employment in the united states. there are certain things an employer can ask and certain things they cannot pass. an employer cannot ask marital status. an employer cannot use that information against you in a hiring decision. >> but how do you prove that? >> we need additional loss? i don't know. there are laws on the books right now. once we had it last summer opened my eyes to a lot of information that employers can gather on people. there is a startup company who is running their business like the way a credit reporting agency runs their business. so what th
for those of innovation that can help shift the task to work being done by educated eco-and the interface between service provider and community and increase the demand. but if we don't ship to innovation, way. >> i should clarify for audience that the human immune system i very specifically targeted by the hiv virus. so as your cd-4 count goes down, you're headed for his part said the case of the disease. we have time for one more question. i think i sought and stars of family care international but air. >> thanks, laurie. i wanted to ask if you could, specifically in what you see as priorities and transcendent possibilities in sub-saharan africa, the region where the problem of hiv/aids is most severe in terms of population and in particular from the perspective of the long-term potential and the question of the most strategic approach in terms of dealing with hava is more or less of it or to publish your integrate cnet with the provision of basic health services, reproductive, newborn and maternal services, what you see is the most appropriate strategy for dealing with this in africa.
education if i ever appeared in a group in public that there was an african-american. there is a lot of that. certainly were physical sexual or sexual abuse is going on. ending it is much tougher to talk about the emotional. as bad as my father's practices were you would not be right for government wear religious mandates are concerned where the behavior constitutes bodily health or safety to have a life-saving blood transfusion or impair major bodily functions the mail genital mutilation should be outlawed as it impairs pleasure or bodily function. christian science believes children should not be taken to the doctor has also been of the gate is successfully in some treatment has led to abuse and neglect conviction. important to treat them together is there a burden on the religious freedom? doesn't compel public interest to justify the imposition? 534 miners is not about genital mutilation is not irreversible in danger health or bodily function. if imposed by physical or sexual violence they should be legally punishable never it is in the same category as other requirements that parents im
colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certain way that did not study such matters. most historians were not educated in matters of a heart or the hearth. therefore they ignore that. it is on cannon's crowds of kings. so by studying the first lady, for example, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in eight lost outside of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he does go shopping. he went shopping for martha, his wife. mr. she was preggers. she had had a miscarriage. he mr., and he bought her some clothes. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so that he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there in campus is george washington suffering through the freezing weather at valley forge was martha washington with her white on it right there in camp. so by studying the first ladies, we get new insights, i think, the presidents and other things. also, washington's closest adviser was alexander hamilton. and one of the chapters in the book talks about
-to-day basis. this library is a model of educating young people. it is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drives them to be candid with john burns says. thank you so much for your work. [applause] >> thank you for keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who has spent a lifetime serving this country. she continues to be active and playable here at the library. i couldn't come here and not mention her for at least a moment. governor, we have done a lot of things over the years. from the mayor to u.s. senator governor, i look to them as great people who have a willingness to serve their country. it is always a family engagement if you're out there. thank you both for serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's wonderful to be back here. [applause] >> i didn't know you'd be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know. we made a movie about ronald reagan and i would like to recognize tonight kevin and his wife. he was the
. >> was different? do you think that educators should allow more choice among the young [inaudible question] >> this is a fascinating question we could spend an hour on. must public-school education, that's what you are suggesting. i know that's what you're suggesting. [laughter] >> okay. one of the things that i have found, and i only took over this in recent years. i have gone over certain things. in high school i was exposed to stuff the bored me to death at the time. thirty or for 40 years later, i remember it with vividness. and then we have an appreciation i can still remember the night watch. canterbury tales by chaucer. all of these things that our children need to be exposed to and not just how i pass this math and science tests. how i get through the next day. it would be a shame we don't expose our children to the right things and give them greater choice with what they want to do with their life. most of them at that age are not sure. sooner or later, something will touch them. i know where i'd be if my life and have been a pattern of 17. keep looking for the thing that you'd do
and he only been working at goodyear just a little over one year. he had less education unless experience. and he already made $600 more a month than i did from a lower paying job. the judge calculated my two years backpay, and i was given 30,000 per year. so i left the courtroom with $360,000. the headlines said from california to chicago to new york and florida, all across this nation -- the headlines read jacksonville, alabama, woman awarded $3.8 million from goodyear tire and rubber. they say that i got that money. the gadsden headline said that as well. i got a lot of compliments of the headlines in the news. well, that was 2003. he went to the 11th circuit record and then my guilt was hurt in the supreme court in november of 2006. life goes on. we had our normal family life the best we could do. but i worked the case just like it was a job. i called over 100 people to find the people that we needed to testify on my behalf. people were afraid of losing their jobs. they were so afraid. that is why they switched over. most of this was color coded. but life went on and my husband had tw
and cut those deals in part because of his lifelong political education. he began as a man in williamsburg, listened to patrick henry, he spoke as homer wrote and loved that partly because he couldn't do it. always a good sign of a politician and a leader when they recognize qualities in others they don't possess. that kind of humility, however relative that term is in talking about the species called politicians is a virtue. he learned how to master the ways and means of politics, because of that disaster of governorship he was faster to react in louisiana when the purchase became open and possibility that you will remember basically napoleon is going to sell this to us, one of the great real estate deals ever and jefferson immediately begins to think we are going to have to amend the constitution to do it because he was a strict constructionist. he had presidential powers, at the third week of august of 1803, the fourth of july, by the third week of august gets a letter from france saying napoleon is having second thoughts so jefferson said we have the power, no problem there and it is d
rate of crossover, spillover of exotic diseases, to what extent have you noticed efforts to educate the local human population on how to modify their lifestyle so it is better to avoid those crossovers? >> there are certainly efforts. in bangladesh they're trying to educate people not to drink raw date palm sap that could contain meepa virus. if you tool it you can kill the virus that people like to drink at fried, a seasonal treat. there are things like that. around the world. in southern china they crack down on the big west markets, at least above ground. they have gone underground, the black market. the big wet markets where all kinds of wildlife parcel live for food, there's a faction in southern china, they call it wild flavor, bogue for eating wild life not because people need the protein for subsistence but because they have some money and this is considered a robust food and one other thing on that in terms of education, local people, i mentioned the original spillover, the pandemic strain of hiv occurred in cameron, i went there to retrace the route that it took from south
to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to the flag, the phrase, accomplish justice for all,shoo be a demand, compelling as separation, and should be a conscious conviction to make that reel real. but we're lacking a sense of urgency, and i don't think great movements in americas are led by elected officials. they responding to the leadership on the ground and that's what we should be doing. how can we have an entire presidential debate and it seems the word poverty was almost something we shouldn't talk about and we shouldn't address, and so i'm really hoping we can begin to change the dialogue, because i'm -- i'm a guy that actually liked to do a balance sheet analysis of our country, and this is why we have interesting partnerships. the manhattan institute, a think tank, is working with us in newark. it
for their transportation and education to someplace where they can live undisturbed as free people. it's interesting than this piece of information came out in the smithsonian magazine, a number of people said to me they've never heard of it. i said i never heard of it either until i stumbled across it in philadelphia. among a couple people have thoughts about this it hadn't occurred to me. when you hope your book is being made into a movie, who do you want to star in a quick people began to say, i wonder whom he could have freed. people thought of john and priscilla hemings. they said well, maybe he could have freed some of his farmers and then someone said joe was a blacksmith and ed was his coat and it turned out in the action jefferson's estate after the war, after his death, joseph is the only one free. jefferson left the rest of the family and slavery a very scattered to different masters. joseph worked for 10 years at a sports, trying to earn the money to buy back his wife and all of his children. one of his children escaped from slavery, but he managed to get most of them back except peter, whose
years and remained seller. let's take them one at the time. work first over education training. offering adult welfare recipients education and training may sound nice, but study after study has shown that it doesn't work. the key has been to require 100 percent engagement in work or work-life activity. in force consequences for families. in order to receive the government's cash assistance, welfare applicants or recipients have got show up and show us they're actively engaged in work or getting there and we will honor they are doing this. strong antifraud measures. welfare programs cannot be naive about the capacity of citizens to try to get it over on the system. we are not afraid to check asset and income, residency, and identity to be be sure the taxpayer funded benefits are going those who legitimate qualify. and performance-based contracts. we pay our not for profit private sector vendors. they were one of the fist social agency to use 100% performance-based contract to provide performance. and we continue do so today. now there is another element of our success that i want to give
to the late education thinking. >> guest: okay. c-span: television in the court. c-span: television in the court. c-span: i bring it up because congress has resolutions ordering the court to go on television. why are you against it? >> guest: i was for it when i first joined the court, and switched and remained on that side of it. i'm against it because i do not believe as the proponents of television in the courts assert that the purr of televising our hearings would be to educate the american people. that's not what it would end up doing. if i thought it would educate the american people, i would be all for it. if the american people sat down and watched our proceedings, gavel to gavel, they would never ask, judge, why do you have to be a lawyer to be on the supreme court? the constitution doesn't -- no, the constitution doesn't say so, but if you know what the real business is, if you know that we're not usually contemplating our naval, should there be a right to this or that or a right to abortion, should there be a right to -- that's not usually what we are doing. we deal with
wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. when you write a book, and this is my first, the publisher has the say on what the title should be. i would call it mississippi morning because we will come up with 6:00 in the morning. tear gas said past, the sun
great increase of productivity for haitian farmers. education another huge change. half are ill let rate. -- and we after the earthquake united -- to develop and test a structure model in over 300 schools in early literacy basically early childhood reading. and people often call me and write articles in the "new york times" and others indicating why would you spend your money. that's a handicap. so, you know, it's very important to start there with the cspj. they also want help setting up a sort of a process to vet their judges. some estimates -- they need to review haitian judges. there's corruption among some of them. some are not qualified to be judges don't have law degrees and et. cetera. we have been renovating correction facilities and are going to build two jails. one a woman's prison and one a man's prison. i think the biggest human rights problem is pretile where something like 80% of the people in prison have never been before a judge. they may have stolen that chicken five years ago. they would have gotten three months or fine or something. one thing that will help that is th
's take them one at a time. work first over education. offering adult welfare recipients education and training may sound nice, but study after study has shown it doesn't work. the key to spend to acquire 100% engagement in work or work like activity. in force consequences for families who comply. in order to receive the government's cash assistance, welfare applicants or recipients have got to show up and shows that they are actually engaged in work, or getting work. we will vigorously monitor that. strong anti-fraud measures. welfare programs cannot be naÏve about the capacity of citizens to deceive or try to get over on the system. we are not afraid to check assets and income and residencies and identity to be sure taxpayer funded benefits of going to those who legitimately qualify. and performance-based contracts. we pay our not-for-profit and private sector vendors for accomplishment. hra was when the first social service agencies that use 100% of performance these contracts to provide employment services to welfare recipients, and we continue to do so today. there is another
mean to the education camps and execution and all of those things. so i think the discussion that has to be made between leaders and their constituents is that if we see something that we can rectify, we should. but we have to understand the limitations of those interventions, because you are far worse off if you fail if you have never gone there to start with. this brings us to syria. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed as an american. i've been to refugee camps and met the women have been gang raped. i've met the families have watched their kids shot before their eyes. i've met the defectors who said their instructions are to go around and kill and rape and torture. and while we sit by and watch that happen, without even giving them weapons to defend themselves, this will be a shameful chapter in american history, my friends, because we could've done something. and we can do something today but we won't. i hear that the new president has been reelected, we will be re-examining all. only 37,000 people have been massacred, i guess in the grand scheme of things that's not too many co
's important in the cities, on who is deciding where the money is going to go between safety and education. you talked about your state legislatures, it's incredibly important. we need women to really get engaged in politics, and we need them to run for office. we need more and more women to run for office, and we focus on democrats, and one of our big focuses in the next many years is to get more women to run for the legislature to run for city council to run for mayor's races, because that's our pipeline for congress, but it's also the regulations and laws getting passed every day that are affecting our lives and the lives of our families. >> thank you. other questions? >> i'm a journalist for -- [inaudible] >> in addition to -- i've also seen coverage that women are no longer big bloc that politicians can get with one issue and women maybe did make a difference because you can no longer count on them to just vote on issues -- can you address that question ask the challenge for you and in general in seeing women as a monolithic voting bloc. >> i've always thought it was odd -- because i've be
. it was a continuation of the libertarian movement about which ron paul rose. he was educated to become the political thinker by the works of the rakes of hayek and they always embraced leonard read of the foundation about what change was about, on educating one mind at a time. ron paul has used politics is the tool for that libertarian goal and if you asked me 10 years ago, i would've said maybe with the best tool because he was merely describes your outlier in congress, but he's proven me 100% wrong using the tool of major party politics. he's been one of the greatest educators for libertarianism of our time as david said. it's not just about politics. the other sort of gap that ron paul bridges is key to his appeal is the apocalyptic ron paul who was at the same time to very hopeful ron paul. ron paul is one of the other politicians around who is willing to say, america is not necessarily the greatest khmer riches come of this wonderful nation in the world that can only do rate overseas and if there's anything wrong, for the other guy. in foreign policy terms, behavior overseas is actually in some
to trading the poll workers and educating the voters, that was, you know, definitely a good step in the right direction. and then there are probably things that could be improved for voter education. one was, megan kind of touched on the preference of voters, but i think in some insist voters don't realize that either machine, both, will record your ballot. it's not one is, you know, they sit there because they are confused. not because one is for show. and then also the other thing with voters is sometimes issues, you know, reported but they're not actually things that -- anything can be done about it. touchscreens coming in, sometimes people would say oh, the machine is broken. it's not actually broken, but you do need to press down on the screen. so that gets reported as a machine problem when in reality it's a user error. >> thank you. >> what i would suggest is, especially during the early voting, opposed to having just touch screen machines in the voting, also paper ballots. a lot of senior citizens and disabled, that are familiar with the touch screen. they come into the precinct, they
education that most medical schools only spent four hours on micturition. if you look at her disease, i don't know the exact number, but there's a huge percentage of heart disease based on nutrition and lifestyle choices. heart disease is the number one in america. i think what he's trying to do is basically bring some doctors out of the country of reteach agree teaches them anyway, a much more holistic look at the body, teaches them preventive medicine, nutrition and other things. these are not just primary care doctors. these are specialists as well. so she goes to the clinic. excuse me, goes to the fellowship program where she was reinvigorated by an end to find another clinic to process data. c-span: so when they see the very well-known book writer, lecturer and d. and r. nash and nice, who was going to say i now know where they're coming from? >> guest: i think a lot of people view dr. lyle and dr. ornish is french.there is, who advocate for alternative medicine. i think that is an unfair viewpoint. first of all you think they're both incredibly smart and passionate about fixing our he
reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades. had the largest infrastructure investments since eisenhower. the largest research investment after. the largest low-cost tax cut since reagan went to more than 95% of the country and less than 10% country noticed it. but in my book i do try to get deep into the bowels of the white house and the backgrounds of capitol hill, but also to be a fly on the wall on the energy department weatherization division, actually known as the turkey farm. add to the local high-speed real meetings in the central valley where i saw obama called it replaced. i did spend some time in that way to think he's too fancy sillinger factory factory, to. but my novel approach was to try and figure out what he's doing. another spoiler alert here, but the most important thing you should know about obama's a mostly try to do what he said he would do. he came into office at this and usually well-defined theory and a straight up with that. to guard this. his kid and agenda in 2008 to attract a lot of attention in the media was obsessed with his rac
education and health adviser, she recommended me for the virginia state board of education. i was appointed to that, and worked with becky at that point because she was serving in the cabinet of george allen as well so we got to work with kate on state level issues as well. she's the author of a new book called "divider-in-chief: the fraud of hope and change." it's selling outside, and she'll sign copies, if you like, after she speaks. kate was born into a family of conservative leaders. she resides in win jr. chester with four extraordinary wonderful children, especially the youngest daughter, one of the most gracious young ladies i've ever seen. i want her for myself, but i get to visit with her every now and then. a wonderful activist for our cause. please join me in welcoming kate. [applause] >> thank you, all, so much. it's wonderful to be here. let's talk about courage. i have to point you to the two ladies here with me. what a joy it was to get to know becky when i worked in the allen administration during a real revolution. o great restoration, and virginia was going true a difficul
, lizzie was in any conventional sense much better educated having attended both elementary and 40 school, and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing that this capable woman couldn't do from laying linoleum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away at england and later she helped run of the mill's boarding house. like many rural housewives she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to be absorbing these kinds of responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and develop and. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, leaving him a way to work with two very small girls but lizzie had raised the girls as their own and given birth to eight more as well. of these 10 children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of the -- sense of a cong
other southern evangelicals, migrated to california, set up mega-churches, educational institutions and eventually became differently involved in politics. beverly lahaye who is a particular interest of mine in this book, founded a group called concerned women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states. she based her organization on five spiritual principles, the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life and she began to litigate, arguing that religious parents should have more control for example over what their children were taught in school, arguing that the era, the equal rights amendment for women was a violation of the fundamental order of things, and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she retired about, almost 15 years ago now and lives in california. >> host: somebody would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i very much would like to talk to her and one of the things that's really important is that an organization lik
do, it is squarely driven by oup. oup oxford is about fundamental education. we often say that we don't exist to make money but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. and that really doesn't form all of the work that we engage in. personally one aspect of what we do at oxford that i particularly enjoyed, and that is the kind of publishing that i think oxford does especially well and is specially important these days is to essentially take the work of scholars who often exist in fairly influenced environment speaking to members of their own discipline-based tribe and try to help them translate their work to a larger audience and that sometimes can be a real challenge. but it goes to the heart of what oxford should be doing which is not publishing works to very small groups of intellectuals, although that is a crucial part of what we do, but also trying to identify works that are broader input and trying to bring those works to people who are interested who did do not reside in the academy. so i think the subtitle of the session today is the publishing world toda
that freedom requires i would just like to hear your thoughts and education we address the teachers, the curriculum and all these things that are major problems children come to school without virtues and the schools are trying to nurture character and education that i'm not sure you believe the public schools is the place to nurture that were held as our society or culture doesn't march to nurture those virtues. how do we address problems in the schools? can you address these virtues? >> this is a good question. moynihan said the family of the smallest school, and by the time a lot of negligently parenthood to no fault of their others are doing their best, these children go to school and it is too late. i remember chicago school teachers saying she routinely gets first graders who do not know numbers, sheikhs or colors. because she said no one ever cooking dinner turned around and said green round of peace. there are in a culture of silence except for television. showing three runs of jeopardy. as i say, it is america's biggest problem. thank you very much. [applause] >>> what's go
sharply. in education too throughout the 90s several states were spending much more of their state budgets on corrections and prison building than they were on higher education. california and texas are two states doing just that. why do we have so many prisoners? one could say there was in the late 7s a rise in violent crime and a series of laws that initially had been passed in response to that but what doesn't make sense if you look at the chart you will see incarceration rates were rising at such a high amount even as violent crime, actually diminishing. when i talk about an addiction to incarceration and talk about it in the context not just of traditional crime and criminal justice but also in the area of education. for those of you in public schools, you know that public schools around country have become increasingly criminalize. the simple principle of this venereal or behavior problems now can result in an arrest and entry to the juvenile justice system. immigration for lack of federal immigration solution, we have increasingly relied on enforcement and the tension and a lot of t
vital issues in the pending tray marked too difficult. so we've broken the monopoly of state education with free schools providing excellent education free to parents who send their children there. we've also established 2,000 academy schools. we've stopped dumbing down. we've introduced tough new powers on discipline in the classroom. there's a whole set of issues that are subject to this long-term reform from this government, issues like putting our universities on a sustainable footing so they can compete with the very best in the world and give everyone a chance to go to them irrespective of their background or income, modernizing our energy and transport infrastructure so we can keep up with our competitors in the global race, regulating our banks properly, so that immoral behavior and the gross mistakes of the past are not repeated. we're dealing with the challenges of an ageing population. we've reformed public-sector pensions so they are both affordable and fair for both public-sector workers and the taxpayer. in every case, we've put the national interest at the heart of this
today on c-span, the student debt crisis starting at 630 eastern. education reporter marion wing joins the panel on the impact a student at on families followed live at it:00 with calls, e-mails command tweets along with "wall street journal" reporter josh mitchell later today on c-span. >> afghan president is visiting the u.s. this week. tomorrow meeting with president obama at the white house. also tomorrow, speaking at georgetown university. that is at 5:30 p.m. eastern, and you can see it live on our companion network, c-span. >> the "washington post" recently held a forum on women. labor secretary held that silas spoke about her career from and turning in the white house during the carter administration to serving in the obama administration. since this discussion from december, the secretary announced she is leaving her post at the end of the president's first term. >> good morning, and welcome. we have a remarkable gathering of women this morning, and they are -- their personal stories and backgrounds are as varied as america itself. they come from los angeles and cleveland and
administration has not delivered on its campaign promises, things like dismantling the department of education, getting rid of the department of energy, cutting down on government spending. clearly government spending is far more than it was when reagan took office. taxes are greater. in terms of performance, in terms of delivering our campaign promises in 1988 think it is indeed a failure in that sense. now, it's a success in another sense, namely that i think that the level of debate has been raised in our country on a whole range of issues. a key one is the legitimate role of government in a free society. c-span: that is a call in show here at the end of the reagan administration. what is your reaction when you hear that today? >> guest: well, there is not much that has changed. we still need to ask, or settle, what is the legitimate role of government in a free society and a legitimatlegitimat e role of government in a free society is not that of government taking what belongs to one american and giving it to another american to whom it does not the long. c-span: have you ever in your life
on transparency of the public sources. it means fighting for justice in terms of education for the population so that they can work with determination to make their contribution to rebuilding their respective economies. the success knows no frontiers. and my officers will be dedicated, not only to getting haitians into the schools, to keeping up the fight against corruption, to establishing a rule of law, and my hope and trust is that the results will come. within less than two years, more than a million children have been left by the wayside now have free access to education. without any effort other than what has come from our treasury. already the effort for reconstruction is paying off with more than 1 million homeless people finding accommodation. and part of this, these benefits, come from the money, from you, the taxpayer's. and i say to them, all of our gratitude, to ensure that their solidarity has not been wasted. those who are most vulnerable are the ones who benefit the most. we wish well a country based on rule of law, and it is taking shape in front of our eyes, but yet the institu
the list of people -- of the really wealthy people and what they paid in taxes. it's a real education to go become and look at that. and i can't imagine what that education would look like today. if you had the same two pieces of information. >> host: one more question before we go to calls. you said you have to -- do you have to be a so-called egyptologist to read bills. >> guest: the taxes are the most demanding. it's not so much you have to have any special training. you just have to be patient. you have to read it and then try to follow it through. go back through it to see exactly who it applies to. some of these were actually quite obscure. some in terms of special interest provisions and a company incorporated in some state on such and such date, required us to then go to that state and very often go through whatever the filings were for them. one thing we ran across had to do with one company which issued 97 million in bonds or something like that. so, we had some of the database people who inquired, will you search this lexus, and see if anybody issued a bond in that amount. and su
government collects, leaving nothing for education, national defense, or other essential programs. we have no illusion that putting our country on a sound and responsible fiscal course will be easy. it clearly will not. our government is divided and conflicted because the american people are divided and conflicted. but we cannot ignore this crisis any longer. nor can our leaders. as important as economic growth is, we can't grow our way out of this problem, and we certainly can't tax our way out. what we must address is the fundamental reality that due to our aging society, and increased life expectancy, the entitlement programs written and designed for an earlier era must be revised. we are not talking about cuts in absolute terms. we are simply talking about slowing the rate of increase, and this can be achieved with reasonable adjustment phased in over a number of years. comprehensive tax reform is another essential part of the solution to our fiscal crisis. the right kind of tax reform will make us more competitive across the globe, and empower our businesses, small and large, here at
, the need for poll workers training to be clear and voters to be a better educated. from my perspective those are systems of a system that is not designed for this kind of thing. we are asking pol workers to do more today than was ever contemplated when the idea of having a community poll workers was conceived. in my jurisdiction trying to serve 12 different languages across 4800 different polling places on election day is not a model that is sustainable. >> one last comment before i move on to don rehill, it is very valuable to have individuals like yourself who are both an election official but also a county clerk, engage in the discussion about the next generation of voting systems. for those of us to deal exclusively with voting systems we are a bit myopic at times about where we see government solutions going to. county clerks on the other hand, their offices are filled with applications that provide the kinds of services at a level and a cost point that their constituents are looking for beyond voting systems. i really like that perspective that you bring. as i said earlier many o
be in jail. when they walk into the inner city areas and start talking about poor children's education, it's not because they want kids to read and write. it's because they know the government spent $600 billion a year on education and they want it and they are going to get it. there is no mechanism left except civil disobedience and having covered movements of a round the world, the revolutions in eastern europe, the palestinian uprising sort the street demonstrations that brought down slobodan milosevic, you know the tinder is there. i spent the last two years in the poorest pockets of the country from camden new jersey to the produce fields in florida, the fields of southern west virginia to the you know the tinder is there but you never know what's going to set it off. it's usually something relatively benign. an elderly woman gets for close to her home in utah or something. but i know that it's coming. will it look like occupy? will it be called occupy? you may never know. i think it's better to think of occupy not as a movement, but as a tactic. rosa parks refused to move on the bus.
, education, support to senior leaders and development and development might be the place where we find the big ideas if you will about what we need to do. but we're working at it will get something to the secretary of defense as his successor is confirmed before he leaves the job. >> mr. secretary, first of all on immediate or cautionary steps reducing on mission sending a commit a free freeze on civilian hiring a contract, is there a dollar amount on not, on the amount of money you'd be saving? >> but i've asked all the services to do at our budget you guys to look at all these different pieces until they would ultimately can we say by virtue of the steps. i can't give you a number now. but what i said is we got to do everything we can to achieve whatever savings we can in the immediate future to be better prepared for what we may face. >> i'll tell you right now to look at the billions of dollars we are looking at, will have to squeeze awfully hard to be able to prevent any damage from taking place. were born to suffer some damage. >> the suspect to you, tony. first of 52, not 45? se
's energy. when it comes to hydraulic. we have opportunities going on in 11 states to continue to educate around the breakthrough technology and part of the game-changing opportunity. we say technologies plural, we don't refine and develop not only those technologies but many others. >> thanks for doing this, jack. [inaudible] >> good to see you again. >> you mentioned keystone pipeline. i wonder if you have an assessment whether or not president obama will approve or reject the pipeline. if he does reject it what would the political consequences be? >> we are hopeful he will approve it. we're encouraged what we're learning from the white house the latest report coming out of the nebraska. the governor has to make a final decision there and advance it to the department of state. we're hopeful the president will approve it. when you look from the jobs perspective of the energy needs of the united states, as prime minister harper said, it's a no brainer. we're hopeful the president will step forward. i think it's the indication of the commitment based on the promise to the american people.
of education. for example, the bathroom walls almost every day are covered here and there with "white power" and white power symbols, with slogans such as "blacks are only good for being slaves," and "whites rule over blacks," as well as labeling the working water fountains "whites only," and the non-working fountains "blacks only." and it's extremely difficult to deal with. there is an intense amount of stereotyping as well as hatred floating in the minds and mouths of students and staff of the hanshaw--hanshew and service anchorage school district. i know by personal experience. 'i feel that this is absolutely horrible, that the wars that we as a minority, african-americans, puerto-ricans, etc. , fought many years back have to be refought over and over as the days go by. it's sad that people can't have their own opinions and approve and disapprove without discriminating others. it's a shame that there is only two times in life that we as people with skin and culture differences are seen as equals. those two important days are our first and last days of your--of your life. for example, whe
as enthusist, then became a collector, then became an educator through a website called rag lynn.com and through the book. the story how i discovered historical newspaper happened about five years ago. my wife and i took our first family vacation to georgia lee that, illinois, which is a koa koa city mississippi town. i found a rare book shelf and found a book full of newspaper. it was april 21st, 1865 "new york times" i was reading the about the lincoln's csh that triggered an intense passion for history i had never had. for the next five years it became a journey of meticulous of collecting of newspaper. i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient ak is eases to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access a lot of the originals that are found in the library and institution across the country. i made a point to collect them. much like my other historical collectible. they are available for sale or purchase. if any has seen "american pickers" i would say it's like that. i would say i'm like that more along the license of historic documents a
education but she just imbued in me this notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? just tell you that every day or how do you feel she made -- >> well, she had very high expectations, and let me know that she expected me to do well in school. but when i would talk to her about, i might work in the white house some day or i'm interested in politics or bag lawyer, she never said -- she said, you'll have to study hard and make good grades because you'll need to get a scholarship because i won't be able to afford it. but she never said, -- the sky's the limit was her view. so i did go to law school, and in the early '80s, when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice, and was going around to law firms, and even at that it point there weren't that many women in the law firm and i had guys who interviewed me sit me down and say, you understand, if you come to the firm you have to try cases, you have to go to court. i said i'm excited about it. and then i had clients who in the beginning would -- i'd go in to meet with them and afterwards one of my pa
strategy in personal and what provisions can nasa meek for the retraining of those highly educated nasa scientists and technicians if you end up with those people dhaka they are going to be right now from what i & understand. and two of sort these scientists and highly skilled people that were trained with tax dollars they are going to carry knowledge that no one else possesses that could be valuable to the country can the market absorb those? >> congressman, as we look at one of our tasks was to examine the organizational structure and then by changes to improve the effectiveness of the mission activity. so that is how we address that. as you arrive at new strategic objectives and goals and then nasa creates a strategic plan to accomplish those, we recommend flexibility, not necessarily how it would turn out in terms of the ability to look at personnel and infrastructure aligned with fees' strategic goals and objectives and implementation plans. so, we did note that the jet propulsion lab is a structure and contract folks that are engaged in many aspects of research development and ope
people become hav educated since everybody is a state employee, basically it doesn't matter what you do. but i came that i'm the first time i met a gal was in the metal of some kind of tornado and he was talking about how many liters -- how many theaters per square meter per province. and i said after, dante, i came here to talk about aids. i express my solidarity with people affected by the floods and cuba. and then he started talking about how many cases in jamaica, how many they are, how many they are. anyway, sometimes seeming to figures better than i do despite the fact is that a professor of epidemiology, i have a hard time remembering these figures. since then he said okay, let's have a drink in my office. so we went in the office and asked for water because i said said i just arrived from europe jetlagged and i need to make sure i do my best here. he said no, you don't drink water. no detail, okay. we are in cuba. to make a long story short, we then ended up, as he does sometimes, you can't than half of the government and the vice president and we had dinner and talk a lot about
education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom here at the university? >> i do enjoy teaching and i take every opportunity to meet with students to talk to students and to teach in my spare time. >> how long were you at princeton? >> i was at princeton 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. to the time i came to ten and i was the university faculty of princeton and the provost chief academic and financial officer at princeton said the provost works very closely with the president. >> what is the learning curve on being the president at the university? >> the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. estimate how many students at the university of pennsylvania? >> it has 10,000 undergraduates approximately and 10,000 graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members where we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and sciences and ten other schools. we have 32,000 employees with the largest private employer and
little education, and his father worked extremely hard as a waiter come as a window washer, all kinds of work with the result that he had a very bad back that had to keep on working and the family had to keep on moving. his mother was very resourceful and she would get a deal where the department would be free for one month and they would pay for the second month and they would take a free month and then moved and they kept doing that in order to avoid a friend. so it was a very poor family. and she knew very early on that the notion all you have to do is work hard and you can get anywhere you want to get in life he knew that was nonsense. no one could have worked harder than his father did coming and his father never even entered the middle class. >> when he was in high school he had a number of friends involved in political activity, and you talk about a sort of radical experience, what happened with him at a demonstration in times square. >> yes, we don't have much information about it. it's fairly fuzzy, but we do know that he hung out with some radical minded fellow teenagers in
, considering, you know, where she came from. in korea she had a sixth or seventh grade education. she could speak english. reading and writing was a big challenge for her. there was a point sh. reading and writing was a big challenge for her. there was a point when we were, you know, growing up where she started doing crafts at a local church. she could make anything from scratch and was very gifted. she spent most of her life working for the government and the civil service capacity. she did that in virginia on the various bases down there. she rose to role of a supervisor at the naval base. she had a dream to build her own home. we grew up in a mixed income housing unit. you know, i saw my mother by her first home when i was in high school. within 10 years, my mother bought a piece of property in virginia and had her house built on an acre and a half of land. she was quite successful. c-span: did you move from marijuana to cocaine? >> guest: well, not like that. c-span: but did one thing lead to another? >> guest: yes, it was speed and asset and marijuana and later in high school i became
enclave in the city and he had a private school education near brown university. he became a lawyer, he became a prosecutor. he was in a democratic irish city and then he ran for mayor in the 1970s. and he basically upset the democratic machine and became this italian-american republican mayor in the 70s. he saw him as a way both democratic and republican. he had a special way about him. he was the guy that was seen as going places. he was a champion of urban renewal. some problems ensued and gerald ford lost the election. he went on to become mayor. he had characters who were running around the city stealing manhole covers, selling trucks to private owners. and there was massive corruption. several people in the administration went to prison. he never rounded out his top aide. but he is part of a personal narrative went through a nasty divorce. he basically accused a businessman of sleeping with his wife. a bodyguard held him prisoner for several hours and tortured him with a lit cigarette. he was ultimately charged with assault. and not force his resignation in 1984. and that was the
to educate around these breakthrough technologies. and it really is part of a game changing opportunity. we think technologies, plural, will continue to refine and develop not only those technologies but many others. >> you under thank you for doing this. >> good to see you again. >> you mentioned the keystone pipeline a couple times in your speech but i wonder if you could come if you have an assessment whether my president obama will reject or approve the pipeline? if he does reject it won't be the political consequences be? >> we are hopeful that he will approve it, and right now we are encouraged i what we're hearing from the white house. obviously, as a result of alleged report coming from the state of nebraska, the governor has to make a final decision that may affect the department of state. but we're hopeful the president will approve. i think we'll look at it from a jobs perspective, from the energy needs of the united states, as prime minister harper said on a number of occasions, it's a no-brainer. so we're hopeful the president will step forward. i think will be an early indicat
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